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Image Credit: University of Stirling Marine Conservation Society

Ocean action week fundraiser totals over £600

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This year’s Ocean Action Week Fundraiser raised £625 , which will be split equally between the UK Marine Conservation Society, British Divers Marine Life rescue and the Forth Marine Mammals group with each receiving just over £200

Originally, Ocean Action Week was scheduled to take place between the 22nd and 28th March 2021 although the Dumyat litter clean up had to be rescheduled and took place earlier this month instead.

Despite the pandemic, the fundraiser, which was led by the University of Stirling Marine Conservation Society (UOS MCS) , hosted numerous events including collaborations with other societies such as; a film screening in collaboration with the anime society, the “30 by 30” challenge which encouraged individual’s to select a challenge with the number 30 included and complete it by March 30th and the Dumyat clean up.

Image credit: University of Stirling Marine Conservation society

The Dumyat clean up picked up 184 items in total including cigarette butts and plastic food packaging.

Speaking to Brig about Ocean action week, Caitlin Turner who is president of the University of Stirling Marine Conservation society which fundraised for the Marine Conservation society (UK ) but is not affiliated with them , described it the week of events as an “incredible success”.

“Despite the restrictions imposed by Covid, which saw the vast majority of our events moved online, we were still able to raise a grand total of £625 which will be split equally between our three chosen marine conservation causes: Marine Conservation Society (UK), British Divers Marine Life Rescue, and the Forth Marine Mammals group”

Commenting on the importance of ocean action week , Turner added:

“Ocean Action Week, as much as it was a celebration of our seas, ultimately aimed to engage students and the wider public in the issues impacting the marine environment. In the case of Scottish waters, as proud as we are of the natural beauty of our country, our seas are being neglected, and marine biodiversity is continuing to decline. Despite approximately 37% of our waters being designated as Marine Protected Areas, less than 5% of this is considered truly protected.”

Caitlin Turner-President of the University of Stirling Marine Conservation Society
Image Credit: University of Stirling Marine Conservation Society

Turner concluded by giving examples of how individual’s can get more involved in conservation work and environmentalism.

“Get involved in local litter picks and beach cleans, volunteer for conservation organisations like the MCS, join conservation societies at your university or even start your own. Join citizen science projects monitoring our coastal wildlife, sign petitions, write to your political representatives.”

The society president has also created a list of petitions that individuals can sign if they wish , which are linked here

Feature image credit: University of Stirling Marine Conservation Society

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